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Two Brilliant (standard:adventure, 20070 words)
Author: AxelinSecretAdded: Jan 20 2008Views/Reads: 2038/2443Story vote: 0.00 (0 votes)
“Ahh but you are forgetting mate, see that maybe what she wants – nothing lasts forever. Here’s a nickel’s worth of advice that I’m going to give you for free, it is better to die on your feet then to live on your knees,” he shrugged his shoulders, “And i
 



Two Brilliant 

Chapter 1-My Business 

One small raindrop led the way through the sky. As it dived down it
sliced a path through the air, past tall buildings and faces as they 
gazed from upper storey windows. An under-current picked it up and blew 
it to the west and it hit the underside of an exposed gutter. Walking 
the well trodden path home, a young woman ducked underneath an awning 
and felt the trickle of the raindrop running down her neck. Looking out 
from underneath she let the fresh rain wet her face and wash away the 
day; she smiled as she watched men running with newspapers over their 
heads and heard the sounds of women's heels hitting the pavement, as 
they made a mad dash to protect their blow dried hair. She stepped out 
from under the awning and walked steadily towards Mill Lane. Gently 
combing her caramel curls off her face, she turned and walked down the 
narrow street. The soaring hotel stood on her right, tall and 
shadowing, even in the near pitch black of the night. Her foot 
carelessly splashed a puddle as she looked over her left shoulder, 
disturbed by a noise. Scolding herself for being paranoid she turned 
back to the front, gently shaking her foot to get off any clinging 
droplets of water. The first thing she felt was embarrassment, not 
pain, and not discomfort – at least not the usual kind. She felt 
humiliated she'd run straight into a man, not paying attention to where 
she was going- she almost apologized. Then she saw the knife. She 
blinked, looked up into his face and breathed out hard. She turned to 
run, but two men had slunk up behind her and caught her, pushing her 
back. Holding onto her tightly the two cronies laughed as the man in 
front of her began to speak. “Walkin' d'wn here, jus' ta meet us?” he 
smiled, “And such a pretty one too, I am so glad you made the effort, 
sweetheart.” He grazed the back of his fingers down her cheek. She 
jerked with uneasiness. He pressed the knife up against her neck; a 
small cut appeared, no bigger then a centimetre, where he had laid the 
pressure. She didn't even whimper. “That's right, don't scream, don't 
yell,” he showed his teeth in a way that suggested smiling, but was 
actually carefully arranged to scare, “It will be simpler if ya jus' 
keep quiet. I don't want to have ta ruin that pretty ‘ead of yours!” He 
undid his belt and unzipped his fly, he shoed his friends off, yelled 
at them to make sure no one came into the lane. He pushed her up 
against the wall. “Just stay still darlin'.” She smiled back at him. 
Then she brought her foot up between his legs. He fell to the ground, 
swearing. The guys came running to help and blocked her exits. There 
was no way out. Terrified she backed away from them all, knowing she 
was cornering herself against the high fence behind her, but knowing 
she had no choice. The man limped forward and hit her with the back of 
his hand, her head bounced off the rendered fence behind her and she 
blacked out. Fog encased her brain; dull sounds penetrated it, but made 
no distinct sense. Thoughts were sluggish, trying to battle their way 
out of her mind, but getting caught up in the thick pea soup which 
fuzzed all through her head. A dull throb, the sounds became more 
distinct and her brain started to register what had happened. No more 
then ten seconds could have passed. She was lying on her side, propped 
up against the wall, the men were shouting now, trying to make a 
decision on what to do with, what they thought was, a dead body. She 
was still, she kept her eyes shut. “Come on – she's not dead, she's 
just unconscious, I didn' even hit her that hard!” “She's not movin'!” 
“Oh, God Mitch, I mean havin' a good time was one fing, but this is 
murder.” “I ain't murdered nobody. She just knocked out. It's better 
this way.” “Really? How so?” “Hey, guys – we came here for a reason! 
Usually they give us hell, makin' loads a noise and not stayin' still. 
Now we got a ‘compliant' one and yous aren't happy.” “That's sick man. 
That's disgusting.” “Alright, then leave. Never wanted you here 
anyway.” Footsteps of a man distancing himself from an unspeakable deed 
receded off into the distance. “So, you staying?” “Mitch...” “I said 
are you staying.” “Yeah, I'll stay.” “Good, that wimp is a foo-” he 
stopped, and then shocked said, “Who's there?” She risked a peek to see 
who he was talking to and saw a shadow flit across behind the two men. 
They spun around. “I said show yourself!” A man stepped lightly behind 
them, now between her and them. Gently picking her up and stabilising 
her balance on her feet. With a little nod towards her to say that 
everything would be okay, he turned back towards Mitch. “I'm right 
here.” “This is none of your business,” said Mitch, gesturing with his 
head at the now clear headed girl behind the stranger. “Oh, I think it 
is.” said this man, “In fact, I'm quite sure that you are the lowest of 
the low. Some of the most horrible examples of humanity I've ever met. 


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