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Eamon's Tales (standard:adventure, 26056 words)
Author: JamesMcFallAdded: Aug 13 2008Views/Reads: 1671/2254Story vote: 0.00 (0 votes)
An Adventure Story
 



EAMON'S TALES “Good Morning Ma”, “And the same to you Helen, are you up
long Helen?”     “Yes Ma, the stove is lit this last half hour, the 
water is nearly on the boil, it wont be long before the tea is ready.”  
“ Good girl, I would be lost without you, give Clare and Eamon a call, 
let the others have a wee lie in, your father is on his way down.” “Ok 
mam, what time are we all going off today?”  “About two o'clock, yous 
have one load of sticks to deliver, I'll have lunch ready when yous 
come back, its to be a good day today, so lets make the most out of it. 
 Here love, take this to your granny, the first cup out of the pot, 
just the way your gran likes it.”  “Alright ma, I'll have breakfast 
ready when you come back with the others, boiled eggs all round, 
alright”. During breakfast there was much talk about where they were 
all going in the afternoon.  Eamon asked his father could his best 
friends come, Sammy and Dennis.  “Sure son, why not” his fathered 
answered, “we have a busy morning first, one load of sticks to go to 
Mister Goldsworth our best customer.  Then a small load to Brian and 
Anna, we can pick up Dennis there” Eamon asked his father another 
question “what's wrong with Dennis's father, dad, he's not like you, 
what's wrong with him, he hardly talks to me, just a smile and a pat on 
the head”.  Sean answered back to his son “Dennis's father is a great 
man, better than most men son, I'll tell you when you're a little 
older.  We go back a long way, Brian and I”.  Sean then took off his 
glasses, and started to clean them, it was Jenny that spoke next.  
“Here take this to Brian, its only made last night, a homemade loaf of 
bread, tell him I was asking for him.  Now eat up and sit up straight”. 
 That was the end of the talking. Sean and his first half of the family 
were on their way to a small plot of land which he owned.  There he had 
a second-hand tractor and trailer, also what was going to be the 
makings of a sawmill one day.  Jenny was getting ready for the rest of 
the family, two more daughters, Cathy and Kerry and Jenny's mother, 
who's name was Helen. Jenny was getting breakfast ready.  Helen could 
see there was something just not right.  Helen asked her daughter 
“what's wrong Jenny?” “Nothing mummy”.  “Come on tell me Jenny, I know, 
what is it?” “Its Helen Mummy, this is her last summer as a child, no 
more school, and Helen is not sure what she is going to do.  Some of 
her friends are talking about going to Belfast for work, its such a 
long way, forty-four miles away and still only fifteen years old”.  
“Look at me Jenny” Helen said  “whatever Helen will do, let it be her 
choice, at fifteen, Helen has a good head on her already, lets wait 
till the end of the summer, I know what you are going through Jenny”.  
With a smile back, Jenny answered “thanks mummy, lets get the rest of 
the bread out ready for the shops mummy.  The treats are on me today”,  
“and me”, Helen answered. In his third attempt Sean got the tractor 
started, with a nod from his head.  Helen knew what to do next, letting 
the engine warm up a bit.  Walking over to the trailer with a grin on 
his face, Sean saw the look on Eamon's face.  Helen then drove over to 
the trailer, Eamon wishing when will it be his turn to drive the 
tractor.  Both Helen and Clare were teasing Eamon about how long he 
would have to wait.  At Mr Goldsworth's Sean let Helen drive again, 
plenty of open space.  All the sticks and logs were unloaded.  He also 
made a good comment to Sean on how Helen was driving the tractor and 
how his other children were all working together.  Sean thanked Mr 
Goldsworth, before leaving. One small load to pick up before going to 
Brians and Annas.  It was never a quick visit there, nearly always an 
hour at least.  Brian showed Sean around the garden, that's where he 
spent most of his time and in the green house.  Before leaving Brian 
gave all four children some pocket money.  Sometimes the children were 
afraid of Brian.  Brian walked very slowly, also he had a good shake on 
his hands and body.  Back home Jenny had lunch ready.  Sammy was 
already there.  It was not long until they were all off.  Further on 
down the coast they went to the seaside.  The weather was great.  It 
was to be a day they would all remember for some time. That was the 
last outing they had that summer.  All the children now were back at 
school.  All but Helen, staying on at home, helping her mother and 
granny mostly baking bread and tarts and selling them at week-ends. 
Sean and Jenny said nothing, knowing each day their first child was 
about to leave home.  At supper one night Sean said “this time next 
month we will be right in the thick of it, Christmas day.  What a fast 
year.  Lets all hope 1957 will be as good as 1956.  The years are going 
so fast”.  “Wait till you get to my age Sean” Helen said “they get 
faster each year” Another weekend, and a very wet one, Sean and Helen 
were off again on the tractor.  “Just the one load today, Helen, Mr 
Goldsworth”.  Helen asked her father “Dad what does Mr Goldsworth do?”  
“I don't really know Helen, neither do most people.  Some say the 
family made a lot of money overseas.  They also say a hard man to work 


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